Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Opinion: It's time for Congress to change health privacy rules

With the door now opened for medical data to be weaponized, HIPAA protections are insufficient for current times.

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via Healthcare Conference

Opinion: It's time for Congress to change health privacy rules

With the door now opened for medical data to be weaponized, HIPAA protections are insufficient for current times.

from Blogs from healthcareitnews.com https://ift.tt/hmSIpTJ
via Healthcare Conference

Friday, June 17, 2022

Will Oracle save the day with its EHR database?

Health IT leaders and federal officials have spent years attempting to solve the challenges Larry Ellison says his company can fix. Many experts are skeptical. But if Oracle can make it happen, it would be a major achievement for healthcare.

from Blogs from healthcareitnews.com https://ift.tt/Mq01Vgr
via Healthcare Conference

Will Oracle save the day with its EHR database?

Health IT leaders and federal officials have spent years attempting to solve the challenges Larry Ellison says his company can fix. Many experts are skeptical. But if Oracle can make it happen, it would be a major achievement for healthcare.

from Blogs from healthcareitnews.com https://ift.tt/Mq01Vgr
via Healthcare Conference

Monday, May 30, 2022

Global Conference on Primary Healthcare and Medicare

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

People with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have chronic intestinal inflammation. Symptoms include stomach cramps, diarrhea and gas. Medications and surgery can help manage IBD flares, putting the condition into remission.


What is inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)?

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of disorders that cause chronic inflammation (pain and swelling) in the intestines. IBD includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Both types affect the digestive system. Treatments can help manage this lifelong condition.

How common is IBD?

Up to three million Americans have some form of IBD. The condition affects all ages and genders. IBD most commonly occurs between the ages of 15 and 30.

What are the types of IBD?

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types of IBD. Types include:

  • Crohn’s disease causes pain and swelling in the digestive tract. It can affect any part from the mouth to the anus. It most commonly affects the small intestine and upper part of the large intestine.
  • Ulcerative colitis causes swelling and sores (ulcers) in the large intestine (colon and rectum).
  • Microscopic colitis causes intestinal inflammation that’s only detectable with a microscope.

What’s the difference between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

IBD is a disease; IBS is a syndrome, or group of symptoms. The causes and treatments are different.

IBS is a type of functional gastrointestinal disease. It affects how the bowels function, causing them to contract more (or sometimes less) often than usual. IBS is also known as spastic colon or nervous stomach.

IBS doesn’t inflame or damage the intestines like IBD, so imaging scans can’t detect it and it doesn’t increase the risk of colon cancer. People with IBS rarely need hospitalization or surgery.

Can you have IBD and IBS?

Yes, it’s possible to have both IBD and IBS. While IBD can cause IBS symptoms, there’s no evidence that having IBS increases your risk of IBD.

What causes IBD?

Researchers are still trying to determine why some people develop IBD. Three factors appear to play a role:

  • Genetics: As many as 1 in 4 people with IBD have a family history of the disease.
  • Immune system response: The immune system typically fights off infections. In people with IBD, the immune system mistakes foods as foreign substances. It releases antibodies (proteins) to fight off this threat, causing IBD symptoms.
  • Environmental triggers: People with a family history of IBD may develop the disease after exposure to an environmental trigger. These triggers include smoking, stress, medication use and depression.

What are IBD symptoms?

IBD symptoms can come and go. They may be mild or severe, and they may appear suddenly or come on gradually. Periods of IBD symptoms are IBD flares. When you don’t have symptoms, you’re in remission.

IBD symptoms include:

  • Abdominal (belly) pain.
  • Diarrhea (sometimes alternating with constipation) or urgent need to poop (bowel urgency).
  • Gas and bloating.
  • Loss of appetite or unexplained weight loss.
  • Mucus or blood in stool.
  • Upset stomach.

Rarely, IBD may also cause:

  • Fatigue.
  • Fever.
  • Itchy, red, painful eyes.
  • Joint pain.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Skin rashes and sores (ulcers).
  • Vision problems.

What are the complications of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)?

People with IBD have a higher risk of developing colon (colorectal) cancer. Other potential complications include:

  • Anal fistula (tunnel that forms under the skin connecting an infected anal gland and the anus).
  • Anal stenosis or stricture (narrowing of the anal canal where stool leaves the body).
  • Anemia (low levels of red blood cells) or blood clots.
  • Kidney stones.
  • Liver disease, such as cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis (bile duct inflammation).
  • Malabsorption and malnutrition (inability to get enough nutrients through the small intestine).
  • Osteoporosis.
  • Perforated bowel (hole or tear in the large intestine).
  • Toxic megacolon (severe intestinal swelling).

How is IBD diagnosed?

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis cause similar symptoms. No single test can diagnose either condition.

To make a diagnosis, your healthcare provider will ask about your symptoms. Your workup may start with a complete blood count (CBC) and stool test to look for signs of intestinal inflammation.

You may also get one or more of these diagnostic tests:

  • Colonoscopy to examine the large and small intestines.
  • EUS (endoscopic ultrasound) to check the digestive tract for swelling and ulcers.
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy to examine the inside of the rectum and anus.
  • Imaging scan, such as a CT scan or MRI, to check for signs of inflammation or an abscess.
  • Upper endoscopy to examine the digestive tract from the mouth to the start of the small intestine.
  • Capsule endoscopy using a small camera device that you swallow. The camera captures images as it travels through the digestive tract.

What are nonsurgical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatments?

IBD treatments vary depending on the particular type and symptoms. Medications can help control inflammation so you don’t have symptoms (remission). Medications to treat IBD include:

  • Aminosalicylates (an anti-inflammatory medicine like sulfasalazine, mesalamine or balsalazide) minimize irritation to the intestines.
  • Antibiotics treat infections and abscesses.
  • Biologics interrupt signals from the immune system that cause inflammation.
  • Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, keep the immune system in check and manage flares.
  • Immunomodulators calm an overactive immune system.

You may also benefit from these over-the-counter IBD treatments:

  • Antidiarrheal medication.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Vitamins and supplements like probiotics.

What are surgical treatments for Crohn’s disease?

As many as 7 in 10 people with Crohn’s disease eventually need surgery when medications no longer provide symptom relief. During a bowel resection, a surgeon:

  • Removes the diseased bowel segment.
  • Connects the two ends of the healthy bowel together (anastomosis).

After surgery, the remaining part of the bowel adapts and functions as it did before. Approximately 6 in 10 people who undergo surgery for Crohn’s disease will have a recurrence within 10 years. Another bowel resection may be a good option for you.

What are surgical treatments for ulcerative colitis?

After 30+ years of living with ulcerative colitis, about 1 in 3 people need surgery.

A surgeon:

  • Removes the colon (colectomy) or the colon and rectum (proctocolectomy).
  • Connects the small intestine and anus.
  • Creates an ileal pouch that collects stool, which then exits through the anus.

Rarely, you may need an ileostomy instead of an ileal pouch. An ileostomy bag attaches outside of the belly to collect stool.

A proctocolectomy is curative. Symptoms won’t return after surgery to remove the colon and rectum. However, you may have problems with the ileostomy or ileal pouch, such as pouchitis (inflammation and infection).

UPCOMING EVENT DATE AND PLACE

* 9th Edition of PHC | 19-21 June 2022 | San Francisco, United States

* 10th Edition of PHC | 21-23 August 2022 | Berlin, Germany

* 11th Edition of PHC | 16-18 October 2022 | Paris, France

* 12th Edition of PHC | 12-14 December 2022 | Dubai, United Arab Emirates

* 13th Edition of PHC | 21-24 February 2023 | Amsterdam, Netherlands

* 14th Edition of PHC | 24-26 April 2023 | London, United Kingdom

Note: Early Bird Registration

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Thursday, May 26, 2022

Global Awards on Primary Healthcare and Medicare


Good Day to All!!!
What about your Primary healthcare?
Join us at the PHC International Online Event 19-21 June 2022 on topic: Health & Medicine Learn from best Worldwide Top Speakers LIVE CONFERENCE At this conference, some of the best speakers on these issues, from around the world, will teach and demonstrate innovative and groundbreaking models in all aspects of health and Medicine.
Visit https://primarycare.pencis.com to book your ticket at our best value early bird prices!
So kindly submit your paper after profile verification and do the registration process. You can also enjoy a special discount offer.
Information Notice: Registration fees (Participating + Memento + Certificate). Don’t miss this awesome opportunity,
Contact us :healthcare@pencis.com

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

Global Conference on Primary Healthcare and Medicare

Early impact of SARS-CoV-2 on human lungs

 Widely studied models of pathogenesis suggest the involvement of various types of cells in the manifestation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related symptoms. However, the origin and order of molecular signals that target certain cell groups are still unknown.


About the study

In the present study, researchers described an experimental model of COVID-19 infection to explore the early molecular events as well as the pathogenic mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 on a cellular level in the human lung tissue.

The team defined the early steps involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection by obtaining sections of fresh lung tissue from organ donors or surgical resections and subsequently exposing them to SARS-CoV-2. A plaque assay was later performed on the supernatants of the culture. The expression of viral and host genes during COVID-19 infection was further characterized by analyzing the lung tissue using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq). The team also explored the junctional processing and structure of the viral RNA molecules by assessing the scRNA-seq dataset against the SICILIAN framework which identifies RNA sequences that mapped discontinuously in a viral genome. 

The lung cell tropism of SARS-CoV-2 was determined by directly comparing the infection of different lung cell types in their natural environment. This was achieved by using the most specific and sensitive markers among the cells present in a healthy human lung to detect the types of cells present in the cultures lung tissue and evaluate their viral RNA levels.     

Results

The study results showed that the generation of infectious SARS-CoV-2 virions rose between 24 and 72 hours after culturing the SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissue. The productive infection was subsequently abated by the pre-activation of the viral stocks achieved by the addition of either ultraviolet light, heat, or remdesivir, which is a ribonucleic acid (RNA)-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor.

The team noted that the number of viral RNA molecules found on each infected lung cell varied widely as almost 99% of the infected cells contained few or no viral RNA molecules while the rest of the infected cells had 10 to over 100 viral RNA molecules in each cell at 24 hours of culture. At 72 hours of culture, almost 0.01% of the infected cells comprised over 1000 viral RNA molecules per cell, which indicated the steep increase in viral production through this period.

The analysis of the scRNA-seq dataset identified subgenomic junctions among the RNA sequence reads, suggesting the production of canonical SARS-CoV-2 mRNAs in the cultured lung tissues. Furthermore, the team recognized several novel subgenomic junctions that indicated the production of varied non-canonical as well as canonical subgenomic viral RNAs during SARS-CoV-2 infection.

The team also identified a total of 55 different molecular cell types in the human lung distributed across the main tissue compartments. These included 80% of the cell types that defined a healthy human tissue with five additional varieties of lymphocytes such as cytotoxic (CD4+) T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, regulatory T cells, tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells, and granzyme K (GZMK+) CD8+ T cell. The healthy tissue also comprised culture-induced proliferative forms of signaling alveolar type 2 (AT2-s) cells, natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and fibroblasts.

Notably, 10 to 20 viral RNAs were found in almost one-third of the lung cell types of the infected cell cultures. Cells having a higher number of viral RNA molecules were rare and were mainly limited to six types of cells which included AT2 cells, lipofibroblasts, myofibroblasts, NK cells, T cells, and macrophages. The team remarked macrophages accounted for 75% of the infected cells with 50 or more viral unique molecular identifier (UMI) per cell. However, such cells having higher viral levels totaled up to only 0.5% of all macrophages which indicated inefficient viral access.

Furthermore, clustering the genetic expression characteristics of macrophages in the cultured lung tissue displayed the separation of the genetic profiles in three different clusters. Among these, one had higher expressions of genes including functions related to mature alveolar macrophages (AMs), such as major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes, and lipid homeostasis. The second cluster included interstitial macrophages (IMs) that expressed low levels of the AM markers while the third cluster included genes expressing nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-KB) signaling and cells similar to IMs.

Overall, the study findings showed that activated interstitial macrophages were the most susceptible target for SARS-CoV-2 infection in the lungs and the prime focus of inflammation. The researchers believe that the present study can be used to further develop therapeutic approaches for lung infections like COVID-19.

*Important notice

bioRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or treated as established information.

Humans have two lungs, a right lung, and a left lung. They are situated within the thoracic cavity of the chest. The right lung is bigger than the left, which shares space in the chest with the heart. The lungs together weigh approximately 1.3 kilograms (2.9 lb), and the right is heavier. #Conference2022 #internationalconference #upcomingevents #Scopus #webofscience #China #medicalconference #onlineconference #journalpublication #healthconference #eventsinchina #inpersonevents #callforsubmissions #Disease #Awards #conference #Nursing #Pencis #Shorts #Healthcare #Research #Doctor #Medicine #Nurse #emergency #psychiatric #nephrologist #anesthesiology #gynecologist #pathologist #gastroenterology #practitioner #nutrition #Primary #Surgical #oncology #Pediatric #physician #surgery #cardiac #covid19 #treatment #diabetic Visit Our Website: https://primarycare.pencis.com/ Visit Our Conference Submission: https://x-i.me/sentheal Visit Our Award Nomination: https://x-i.me/sentawarnomi Contact us :healthcare@pencis.com